The Rise of Body Beautiful

It’s no secret that beauty is subjective. You only have to look through the past 100 or so years to see how the ideal standard of beauty has changed. Skinny, plump, or in between – it’s all been considered beautiful at one time or another. But that’s changing with the rise of body beautiful and body positivity.

By the time they reach 17, 78% of teenage girls will be unhappy with how they look. And that is a shocking statistic. Teenage girls worry about many things, but they way they look shouldn’t be one of them. To add to this, 96% of adult women in the UK report feeling anxious about the way they look. As well as this, 55% of men would change their diet if it meant they looked better, and 23% believe there is a ‘perfect male body’.

These numbers are quite shocking and it’s no wonder that the body positive movement has taken off in a big way. You only have to search the hashtag on Instagram, and you’re inundated with photos of people showing off every part of their body in an effort to show people that everything is normal. Stretch marks, acne, scars, cellulite, fat – it’s all part of a normal human body, and these people are showing the general public this.

Body beautiful is the idea that all bodies are beautiful, and you should love whatever one you’re in. Too often, the media shows us heavily edited, perfectly posed shots of people looking their best. What you don’t see are all the outtakes, discarded shots, and ‘before’ the editing process. It’s because of this that many a young person are learning to hate the body they have.

But with the body beautiful movement, people are being shown how to love their bodies again. They get to see the unedited, less flattering shots of people and can find similarities between those they look up to and themselves. And that’s a really important thing for young people to have – a role model that they see themselves in.

As well as this, most clothing companies now offer ‘plus-sizes’ or inclusive ranges, which make fashion available to everyone – regardless of shape or size. This is an important step in the body positive movement because it allows people to fit in and enjoy fashion. It doesn’t single people out for looking a certain way as everyone can wear whatever they want. This has become a major selling point for people in the UK, where the average size for a woman is a size 16. Although it’s the average, 16 is often considered plus-size, and many models who are a 16 are referred to as plus-sized models.

The body beautiful movement is challenging this stigma, making sure that people know a 16 isn’t ‘too big’ or ‘plus-size’. It allows people the freedom to see for themselves what beautiful is, instead of subscribing to what the media are portraying. From here, the movement hopes to see more ‘plus-sizes’ incorporated into fashion as standard, and more models of this size to reach the mainstream.

In short, the body beautiful movement is an inspiring campaign, designed to stop self-esteem issues around appearance, teaching young people all over the world that their body is beautiful, just the way it is.

By the time they reach 17, 78% of teenage girls will be unhappy with how they look. And that is a shocking statistic. Teenage girls worry about many things, but they way they look shouldn’t be one of them. To add to this, 96% of adult women in the UK report feeling anxious about the way they look. As well as this, 55% of men would change their diet if it meant they looked better, and 23% believe there is a ‘perfect male body’.

These numbers are quite shocking and it’s no wonder that the body positive movement has taken off in a big way. You only have to search the hashtag on Instagram, and you’re inundated with photos of people showing off every part of their body in an effort to show people that everything is normal. Stretch marks, acne, scars, cellulite, fat – it’s all part of a normal human body, and these people are showing the general public this.

Body beautiful is the idea that all bodies are beautiful, and you should love whatever one you’re in. Too often, the media shows us heavily edited, perfectly posed shots of people looking their best. What you don’t see are all the outtakes, discarded shots, and ‘before’ the editing process. It’s because of this that many a young person are learning to hate the body they have.

But with the body beautiful movement, people are being shown how to love their bodies again. They get to see the unedited, less flattering shots of people and can find similarities between those they look up to and themselves. And that’s a really important thing for young people to have – a role model that they see themselves in.

As well as this, most clothing companies now offer ‘plus-sizes’ or inclusive ranges, which make fashion available to everyone – regardless of shape or size. This is an important step in the body positive movement because it allows people to fit in and enjoy fashion. It doesn’t single people out for looking a certain way as everyone can wear whatever they want. This has become a major selling point for people in the UK, where the average size for a woman is a size 16. Although it’s the average, 16 is often considered plus-size, and many models who are a 16 are referred to as plus-sized models.

The body beautiful movement is challenging this stigma, making sure that people know a 16 isn’t ‘too big’ or ‘plus-size’. It allows people the freedom to see for themselves what beautiful is, instead of subscribing to what the media are portraying. From here, the movement hopes to see more ‘plus-sizes’ incorporated into fashion as standard, and more models of this size to reach the mainstream.

In short, the body beautiful movement is an inspiring campaign, designed to stop self-esteem issues around appearance, teaching young people all over the world that their body is beautiful, just the way it is.